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Open Access Highly Accessed Research

Anti-infective treatment in HIV-infected patients during perioperative period

Baochi Liu1*, Lei Zhang13, Ruizhang Guo2, Jinsong Su1, Lei Li1 and Yanhui Si1

Author Affiliations

1 Department of Surgery, Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center Affiliated to Fudan University, 2901 Caolang Road, Shanghai, Jinshan District, 201508, China

2 Department of Stomatology, Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center Affiliated to Fudan University, 2901 Caolang Road, Shanghai, Jinshan District, 201508, China

3 Department of Emergency, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, No.1 Jianshe Road, Zhengzhou, 450052, China

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AIDS Research and Therapy 2012, 9:36  doi:10.1186/1742-6405-9-36

Published: 27 November 2012

Abstract

Objective

To investigate anti-infective treatments in HIV-infected surgical patients during the perioperative period.

Methods

A retrospective study of sepsis and surgical site infections (SSIs) was conducted in 266 HIV-infected patients. The patients were divided into 3 groups based on CD4+ T cells counts in the preoperative period: group A (0–199 cell/ul), group B (200–349 cell/ul) and group C ([greater than or equal to] 350 cell/ul). When the CD4 count was below 350 cells/uL, anti-retrovirus therapy was started. For patients whose preoperative CD4 counts were [less than or equal to] 200 cells/uL, preoperative antibiotic medication was started.

Results

Patients in group A were more likely to get sepsis than patients in the other two groups (p0.01). Among 82 patients with clean wounds, only one patient got SSIs. All patients with dirty wounds had acquired SSIs after surgery. There were only 6 patients dead at 30 days after surgery, a death rate of 2.3%. Sepsis appeared in 110 patients (41%).

Conclusions

Complete evaluation of surgical risk and suitable perioperative anti-infective treatment may lead to better outcome for HIV-infected surgical patients.

Keywords:
HIV/AIDS; Surgical site infection; Sepsis; Anti-infective treatment